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Keith Jarrett: Last Solo – Encore (video)

Keith Jarrett – Last Solo: LIVE in Tokyo, Japan (1984).



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Carlos Rull is a musician living in the San Diego area. His interests include Yoga, Eastern Philosophy, Zen Buddhism, and Gardening. He plays drums, piano, and composes New Age & Ambient music, and his albums are available on iTunes and Amazon.com.

6 COMMENTS
  1. KC

    Hey! I know this! It is from the DVD Tokyo Solo..:-D
    You know, when i first saw this DVD, I finally understood what people meant when they said “He had a very strong left hand…” *grin* The encore is great, isn’t it? They say it is similar to the ones he played in Bremen, but since his variations are different each time he uses it, it sounds quite different! :-))

    A totally unrelated question, but something that I am curious about. When they give out the encore calls and claps, do they clap with the same rythm in the States? I have always wondered, since in Japan, every single major live I’ve been too,always have that same rythm of clapping when calling out for an encore, I was wondering if it is a “Tokyo-Japanese” thing, or if it is universal? Sorry about the stupidity of the question, but i haven’t been for a live anywhere else, unless you can count the Montreux Jazz Festival (in Switzerland), which was an outdoor thing, and i don’t remember clapping for encores at all…
    Anyway, thank you for putting up the file. I will watch that DVD again tonight…:-))

  2. KC

    Hey! I know this! It is from the DVD Tokyo Solo..:-D
    You know, when i first saw this DVD, I finally understood what people meant when they said “He had a very strong left hand…” *grin* The encore is great, isn’t it? They say it is similar to the ones he played in Bremen, but since his variations are different each time he uses it, it sounds quite different! :-))

    A totally unrelated question, but something that I am curious about. When they give out the encore calls and claps, do they clap with the same rythm in the States? I have always wondered, since in Japan, every single major live I’ve been too,always have that same rythm of clapping when calling out for an encore, I was wondering if it is a “Tokyo-Japanese” thing, or if it is universal? Sorry about the stupidity of the question, but i haven’t been for a live anywhere else, unless you can count the Montreux Jazz Festival (in Switzerland), which was an outdoor thing, and i don’t remember clapping for encores at all…
    Anyway, thank you for putting up the file. I will watch that DVD again tonight…:-))

  3. randomguru

    KC: i remember you mentioning that you have this DVD. i have this one too. and i found a video of his “(somewhere) over the rainbow” rendition from the same DVD… one of my all-time favorites. but the sound quality isn’t as good as in the DVD. still, i may post it.

    as far as the encore clapping in rhythm? it happens sometimes, but not all the time. keith jarrett gave 5 encores in san francisco, and people clapped and gave a standing ovation for each one, and once or twice it was in rhythm. when he would get back onstage, the crowd would yell, the clapping would increase in volume, and people cheered.

    but the clapping in rhythm is cool. didn’t know that was common in japan.

  4. randomguru

    KC: i remember you mentioning that you have this DVD. i have this one too. and i found a video of his “(somewhere) over the rainbow” rendition from the same DVD… one of my all-time favorites. but the sound quality isn’t as good as in the DVD. still, i may post it.

    as far as the encore clapping in rhythm? it happens sometimes, but not all the time. keith jarrett gave 5 encores in san francisco, and people clapped and gave a standing ovation for each one, and once or twice it was in rhythm. when he would get back onstage, the crowd would yell, the clapping would increase in volume, and people cheered.

    but the clapping in rhythm is cool. didn’t know that was common in japan.

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